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Entertaining Blogs: Tartine Recipes and More

Entertaining Blogs: Tartine Recipes and More


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In today's Link Love, a spring dessert table, plus teacup centerpieces

Tartine recipes perfect for at-home parties.

Every day, The Daily Meal scours the web for stories worth reading and blogs worth following.

• Your go-to party appetizers: tartines, one with smoked salmon, basil oil, and ricotta, and one with tarragon-flavored veggies and prosciutto. [At Home with Kim Vallee]

• Get inspired with pics of a summery dessert table, filled with citrus cake pops, colorful candy, and popcorn goodie bags. [Celebrations At Home]

• For a simple centerpiece, fill vintage teacups with a stemmed daisy or two — perfect for a bridal shower or summer brunch. [The Party Dress]

• A dreamy summer wedding — complete with twinkly lights, rustic table settings, and hanging candles — leaves us drooling. [House of Earnest]

• Go back in time with retro, brightly colored kitchenware. [Tobi's Blog]


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Tartine Sourdough Country Bread Recipe #33

I call this batch number 33 of the Tartine sourdough country bread recipe, while it may actually be my thirty-third pair of these I'm not 100% positive. I know for sure it can't be any less, but it's probably more. On to the entry.

Another Sunday, another pair of Tartine sourdough country loaves shaped and proofing. My family has come to expect this bread to be on hand during the week, and in the rare case where we have to buy some bread from the grocery store, we are always disappointed. Baking bread is a relatively simple act when you boil it down, and yet getting that perfect loaf out of the oven does not always work out — but I still strive forward.

Although the leaven was prepared later than usual Saturday night it was ready to go (left-hand side image below). As you can see, the bubbles on top indicate there was significant fermentation activity overnight, and judging by the smell (like ripe fruit, almost a hint of vinegar), hopefully, it didn't go too far.

Over my starter's lifetime, I've experimented with using different flour and grains and have settled on a formula that my particular strain seems to thrive on. Instead of following Chad Robinson's Tartine starter formula in his book where he feeds 50% whole wheat, and 50% all-purpose, I feed my starter 100% rye flour. I've found that my starter shows noticeable activity when fed rye exclusively. If you're interested in reading about how to create and manage a sourdough starter like mine, head over there and read on.

Also, if you're one who frequents Instagram, head over and check out my Instagram feed. I typically post many “daily bakes” and those behind the scenes shots that sometimes don't make it into these posts!


Watch the video: How to Make Sourdough Bread: Video of Chad Robertsons Tartine Sourdough (May 2022).